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Local History in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center

Historical Sketch

Fox in field near Lewisburg

Situated roughly four miles north of Corvallis along U.S. Highway 99, Lewisburg was named for Haman C. Lewis, who settled on a donation land claim in the area in 1845 (Oregon Geographic Names, 1944).

Chief landmark of the Lewisburg area, the Lewisburg Hall and Warehouse Company building, was erected in 1911 by local farmers and co-owners John Wesley Dodge, Thomas A. Logsdon, and George W. Mitchell. Originally organized as Locke Grange #15 in 1873, the Mountain View Grange was one of 10 granges organized in Benton County. At its establishment, the Locke Grange met in an old log schoolhouse in Lewisburg. In 1878, the Locke Grange and its membership were absorbed by the Corvallis Grange. However, in 1911, former Locke Grange members formed the Mountain View Grange; when construction was finishing on the Lewisburg Hall and Warehouse Company in October of that year, the newly-formed grange began renting the hall and meeting there regularly. When the warehouse company itself was dissolved in 1925, Mountain View Grange #429 purchased the building that same year for $1,000.

According to the United States Postal Service’s Postmaster Finder, Lewisburg did not have a dedicated post office; residents were likely on a rural delivery route, or collected their mail in Corvallis. Mt. View School, built just northwest of Lewisburg in 1848, was one of Benton County’s first schools.

Manuscripts

Royal G. Jackson Papers, circa 1905-1992
The Royal G. Jackson Papers consist of materials created or assembled by Jackson in the course of his research. The bulk of the materials pertain to the history of the Oregon State University College of Forestry, McDonald – Dunn Research forest, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp Arboretum, and nature-based tourism in central Oregon and Costa Rica. The papers include extensive oral history sound recordings and photographs, in addition to manuscripts, publications and reference materials. In an oral history conducted in 1979, Frank Sargent, an alum of OSU's Forestry Management program, remembers forestry labs in McDonald Forest, Lewisburg Saddle (Box-Item 6.7-6.8), Peavy Cabin, and "A days" to clean Arboretum. Images from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital. The collection's audiocassettes have also been digitized and are available upon patron request.

Photographs

College of Forestry Photograph Collection, 1910-2006
The College of Forestry Photograph Collection consists of images generated and collected by Forestry staff that document a variety of research projects, logging and milling operations throughout the Pacific Northwest, the Forest Research Laboratory, tours, and the construction of Richardson Hall. The images also depict various activities being conducted in the McDonald-Dunn and Blodgett Research Forests, identified and unidentified trees and forests, and aerial shots of multiple locations throughout Oregon. Included in the collection are two folders, including research notebooks, documenting stand management undertaken by the Blodgett and Lewisburg units in OSU's research forests (Accession 2009:046, Box 02). Images from this collection have been digitized and are available in Oregon Digital.

Digital Resources

Looking for online content? Oregon Digital, ScholarsArchive, and Media Space contain a wealth of digitized materials that document the rich history of Oregon's residential communities. Often, digitized materials are gathered together as sets, either by publication or collection. Please note that links listed below are "canned searches" for specific content relating to the city, town, or community in question.

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