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Beer Research Guide: Culture/Society

WAYS TO LEARN ABOUT BEER CULTURE AND SOCIETY

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THE CHURCH AND BREWING

Things to know

Recommended publications

GERMAN IMMIGRATION

There are many ways to think about Germans and brewing. Research topics might include migration and immigration patterns, the role of German brewers as community activists, the total number of German brewers versus brewers with other countries of origin, the impact of wars in Europe on migration, differences in training and education, and the impact of language. 

Recommended publications 

Archival collections and materials

DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS

Things to know

Drinking establishments are governed by both culture and the legal system.

  • A tavern is a place of business where people gather to drink alcoholic beverages and be served food, and historically, where travelers receive lodging. An inn is a tavern that has a license to put up guests as lodgers.
  • A German beer garden is an outdoor area where beer and local food is served and entertainment (music, song, games) is shared to create an atmosphere of Gemütlichkeit (good cheer).
  • A saloon is a historical style of American bar and is most often associated with the "Old West" for the decades between 1840 and 1910. 
  • A pub, or public house, is an establishment licensed to serve alcoholic drinks for consumption on the premises. A brewpub is a combination of a brewery and bar, where the beer comes directly from the brewery. An establishment can only be designated a brewpub if more than 25% of the beer is sold on-site.
  • In the United Kingdom, the British Beer and Pub Association and the Scottish Beer & Pub Association focus on issues that matter to the beer and pub industry, including campaigning against the increases to beer taxes that are damaging to community pubs. 

Recommended publications

Google Scholar: links to search results pages

ADVERTISING AND BREWERIANA

Looking for information about advertising and breweriana (e.g. physical items like beer cans, bottles, bottle openers, labels, tin signs, beer mats, beer trays or taps, wooden cases and neon signs)?

Things to know

  • There are many online websites for organizations dedicated to this type of collecting, including Morean BrewerianaNational Association Breweriana AdvertisingBrewery Collectables Club of America (includes a list of links to other clubs and resources).
  • Newspapers are an excellent source for finding and examining historical beer and brewing advertisements. Searching digitized newspaper collections for "beer," "brewery," or other iterations and combinations of similar terms will often result in advertisements for specific breweries from the past. Chronicling America (a Library of Congress hosted, digitized collection) offers national U.S. papers, while Historic Oregon Newspapers focuses on publications from the state. 
  • The New York TimesMachine, the New York Times' digitized archive of full issues from 1851 through 2002, allows users to both search and browse all issues from the publication. While advertisements will not be returned through searches, a browse through issues from a particular year or time period will show advertisements for beer, breweries, and more, although the process will be more involved than a full-text search. Information on creating and logging into the Times online can be found here.

Recommended archival collections at OSU

Recommended publications

BEER AND BREWING IN SPORTS, NOTABLY BASEBALL

Things to know

  • Search Terms: (with the preface of beer, brewing, brewery, etc.), often in combination with each other:
    • Sports
    • Baseball
    • Stadium
    • Owner
    • Advertising
    • Sponsorship
    • Endorsements 
    • Radio
    • Billboard
    • Concessions
    • Markets (Regional, Local, National)
  • The Milwaukee Brewers—Major League Baseball Team—are obviously a potential place to start, although they were founded in 1969 and only began playing in Milwaukee in 1970. The Braves were previously located in Milwaukee, and I believe there is a story of their coming-to and eventually leaving the city that is tied to Miller Brewing or its owner.
  • Several professional team owners in the early twentieth century also owned breweries. For example, the Hoffbergers owned both the Orioles and National Brewing in Baltimore (see recommended publications) and Jacob Ruppert Jr. was a prominent regional brewer who also owned the New York Yankees. 

Recommended publications

RACE AND INCLUSION

Things to know

Recommended publications

COMING SOON TO THIS PAGE

Throughout fall 2020 we'll be adding research resources to this page on sports, the history of festivals, homebrewing.