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BRR 100: Great Experiments in Bioresource Sciences

Choose Any of These Styles

Pick one of these three styles and use it for Library Assignment Part 2.

Using a consistent citation style helps other people find your references more easily and makes you look like a smart researcher.

American Psychological Association (APA) Style

Albins, M. A., & Hixon, M. A. (2013). Worst case scenario: potential long-term effects of invasive predatory lionfish (Pterois volitans) on Atlantic and Caribbean coral-reef communities. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 96(10-11), 1151–1157.
Frazer, T. K., Jacoby, C. A., Edwards, M. A., Barry, S. C., & Manfrino, C. M. (2012). Coping with the lionfish invasion: can targeted removals yield beneficial effects? Reviews in Fisheries Science, 20(4), 185–191.
Sullivan, H. A., McCreedy, C., & Morris, J. A. (Eds.). (2013). The invasive lionfish: assessments and impact management. Hauppage, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

Chicago Manual of Style

Albins, Mark A., and Mark A. Hixon. 2013. “Worst Case Scenario: Potential Long-Term Effects of Invasive Predatory Lionfish (Pterois Volitans) on Atlantic and Caribbean Coral-Reef Communities.” Environmental Biology of Fishes 96 (10-11): 1151–57.
Frazer, Thomas K., Charles A. Jacoby, Morgan A. Edwards, Savanna C. Barry, and Carrie M. Manfrino. 2012. “Coping with the Lionfish Invasion: Can Targeted Removals Yield Beneficial Effects?” Reviews in Fisheries Science 20 (4): 185–91.
Sullivan, Harris A., Cliff McCreedy, and James A. Morris, eds. 2013. The Invasive Lionfish: Assessments and Impact Management. Hauppage, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

Nature Style

1.
The invasive lionfish: assessments and impact management. (Nova Science Publishers, Inc, 2013).
2.
Albins, M. A. & Hixon, M. A. Worst case scenario: potential long-term effects of invasive predatory lionfish (Pterois volitans) on Atlantic and Caribbean coral-reef communities. Environmental Biology of Fishes 96, 1151–1157 (2013).
3.
Frazer, T. K., Jacoby, C. A., Edwards, M. A., Barry, S. C. & Manfrino, C. M. Coping with the lionfish invasion: can targeted removals yield beneficial effects? Reviews in Fisheries Science 20, 185–191 (2012).

Assignment Example

Albins, M. A., & Hixon, M. A. (2013). Worst case scenario: potential long-term effects of invasive predatory lionfish (Pterois   volitans) on Atlantic and Caribbean coral-reef communities. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 96(10-11), 1151–1157.

 

The Pacific red lionfish has recently invaded Western Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs, and may become one of the most ecologically harmful marine fish introductions to date. Lionfish possess a broad suite of traits that makes them particularly successful invaders and strong negative interactors with native fauna, including defensive venomous spines, cryptic form, color and behavior, habitat generality, high competitive ability, low parasite load, efficient predation, rapid growth, and high reproductive rates. With an eye on the future, we describe a possible "worst case scenario" in which the direct and indirect effects of lionfish could combine with the impacts of preexisting stressors--especially overfishing--and cause substantial deleterious changes in coral-reef communities. We also discuss management actions that could be taken to minimize these potential effects by, first, developing targeted lionfish fisheries and local removals, and second, enhancing native biotic resistance, particularly via marine reserves that could conserve and foster potential natural enemies of this invader. Ultimately, the lionfish invasion will be limited either by the lionfish starving--the worst end to the worst case scenario--or by some combination of native pathogens, parasites, predators, and competitors controlling the abundance of lionfish.

 

Frazer, T. K., Jacoby, C. A., Edwards, M. A., Barry, S. C., & Manfrino, C. M. (2012). Coping with the lionfish invasion: can targeted removals yield beneficial effects? Reviews in Fisheries Science, 20(4), 185–191.

 

Invasive species generate significant environmental and economic costs, with maintenance management constituting a major expenditure. Such costs are generated by invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois spp.) that further threaten already stressed coral reefs in the western Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. This brief review documents rapid range expansion and potential impacts of lionfish. In addition, preliminary experimental data from targeted removals contribute to debates about maintenance management. Removals at sites off Little Cayman Island shifted the size frequency distribution of remaining lionfish toward smaller individuals whose stomachs contained less prey and fewer fish. Fewer lionfish and decreased predation on threatened grouper, herbivores and other economically and ecologically important fishes represent key steps toward protecting reefs. However, complete evaluation of success requires long-term data detailing immigration and recruitment by lionfish, compensatory growth and reproduction of lionfish, reduced direct effects on prey assemblages, and reduced indirect effects mediated by competition for food. Preventing introductions is the best way to avoid impacts from invasive species, and early detection linked to rapid response ranks second. Nevertheless, results from this case study suggest that targeted removals represent a viable option for shifting direct impacts of invasive lionfish away from highly vulnerable components of ecosystems.

 

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