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OSU Buildings History - SCARC Archival Resources

Avery Lodge Building History

Avery Lodge Records, 1966-2014:

The Avery Lodge Records document the residents of Avery Lodge Cooperative House as well as many of the activities that the house sponsored. A cooperative house for men, Avery Lodge was open on the OSU campus from 1966-2014.

Daily Barometer articles: (available on microfilm and bound printed copies)

  • August 3, 1966 3:3-4 

OSU Memorabilia Collection:

The Memorabilia Collection is an artificial collection containing items of interest about Oregon State University and to a lesser extent, the city of Corvallis, and the state of Oregon.

  • Box-Folder 46.2: Co-op Houses, 1966-2003 (Newspaper clippings, promotional brochures, student papers on history, correspondence)

Facilities Services Records, 1888-2010:

The Facilities Services Records document the physical campus of Oregon State University in Corvallis as well as OSU facilities throughout the state of Oregon beginning with construction of the first building on the current campus in 1888. The records consist predominantly of architectural drawings and files for the design, construction, and modification to structures. For facilities information on Avery Lodge, click here.

  • Files relevant to Avery Lodge include:
    • Series II.  Building Project Files, 1938-2002 1974-1998
    • Series III.  Building Specifications and Reports, 1909-2003
    • Series IV.  Capital Construction Project Files, 1962-1997

*To quickly access files relevant to Avery Lodge, hold down the 'Ctrl + F' keys and search for "Avery" in the pop-up search bar*

  https://oregondigital.org/media/medium-images/p/3/oregondigital-fx71c983p.jpg

Avery Lodge was built in 1966 as a co-operative house.
It was named for Joseph C. Avery, one of the founders of Corvallis.
It is located on Madison Avenue between 9th and 11th Streets.


Oregon Digital:

Visit Oregon Digital for more images of Avery Lodge.

About Joseph C. Avery

For biographical information on Joseph C. Avery, visit his Benton County Historical Society page.
For information on Joseph C. Avery's role as a founder of Corvallis, visit the City of Corvallis History page.

OSU Memorabilia Collection:

The Memorabilia Collection is an artificial collection containing items of interest about Oregon State University and to a lesser extent, the city of Corvallis, and the state of Oregon.

  • Box-Folder 14.4: Avery Family, Articles of Genealogy, 1911-2004 (Correspondence, newspaper clippings genealogy data, obituaries, 1913 Plat of Avery farm, family histories
  • Box-Folder 14.5: Avery, Joseph Conant, 1870-2004 (Correspondence, newspaper clippings, period copy (July 1870) to Commissioner of Agricultural College Lands)

Occidental Messenger:

Joseph Avery was an editor for the Occidental Messenger. The Occidental Messenger was a weekly paper first published in 1857 (it's subsequent titles were: The Democratic Crisis, Oregon Union, and The Oregon Weekly Union). It is available, along with succeeding paper titles in .pdf form below and on microfilm upon special request via ILL. See below for more information about the newspaper.

 

FAQ: Was Linus Pauling Middle School in Corvallis originally named Joseph and Martha Avery Middle School?

In 2005 the Avery name was proposed and approved for the middle school, but never formally adopted, due to the controversy that arose around Avery’s views on slavery. No signage was ever installed on the school with the Avery name. The Joseph Avery Memorabilia Collection file has articles on the middle school naming controversy.

 





  Joseph C. Avery, 1817-1876

 

'The Occidental Messenger'

Here you will find links to accessible issues of The Occidental Messenger. Please note that Joseph C. Avery is not listed as editor for the paper during its publication. However, there is a source that states Avery's role with the newspaper as purchasing the equipment for the paper (David D. Fagan's History of Benton County, 1885). The accompanying issues do contain relevant articles on slavery in both Oregon and in the United States. These issues are over 150 years old, so may be difficult to read. Zoom in to see more clearly. At this point, the issues are not full text searchable, though we hope to make them so in the near future.

Also included are the subsequent Newspapers which replaced The Occidental Messenger: The Democratic Crisis, Oregon Union and The Oregon Weekly Union.

Click here for more information pertaining to The Occidental Messenger.