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MB 440: Food Microbiology

This is a library course guide for students in Food Microbiology, MB 440/540, at Oregon State University. This page was created to support your work in MB 440/540.

Is this a Peer Reviewed Journal?

 One way to decide if a journal is peer reviewed is to look it up on Ulrichsweb. The description will tell you if it is "refereed" and that is another way of saying that articles in that journal undergo "peer review." 

Evaluate Your Sources

  • Does the source have a bibliography? This can lead you to other sources.
  • Is there an author listed as part of the citation? Judging authority can be difficult without an author.
  • Is the journal refereed (peer reviewed)?
  • How old is the source? Will this matter for your topic? Currency of information can be important. Some aspects of a topic may need currency more than others.
  • What other terminology is being used either by the author or by the database? Keep an eye out for other words you can use in your search statements.
  • Does The Valley Library own the journal (either in print or electronically)? If we don't own it, it will take more time to get your hands on the source.

Use the Journal Website

One of the best places to find out if a journal is peer-reviewed is to go to the journal's website (just Google the journal title).

Most publishers have a website for a journal that tells you about the journal, how authors can submit an article, and what the process is for getting published.

If you find the journal's website, look for the link that says "information for authors," "instructions for authors," "submitting an article" or something similar.

Journal peer-review statement