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TCE 564: Advanced Instructional Strategies  

Resources for Teacher and Counselor Education
Last Updated: Aug 26, 2013 URL: http://guides.library.oregonstate.edu/course-guide/2981-TCE564 Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Finding Articles

Many college-level assignments ask you to find articles.  You are in luck! The library provides free access to many, many different kinds of articles, from international newspaper articles to popular magazines to scholarly journal articles.  Whether you are starting with an idea for a topic or the citation for a specific article, the library can get you the article you need. 

Use this page to figure out what type of article works best for your situation and how to find articles.

 

Finding a scholarly article

College-level research often requires you to find scholarly journal articles (also referred to as peer-reviewed articles or research articles).  Scholary articles are written to convey the results of original study, research or experimentation.  They are written by experts in a discipline for other experts in the discipline. There are often specific sections in a scholarly article, such as an abstract, methods, results and references.  

You can find scholarly articles in general databases like 1Search, in subject-specific databases or via Google Scholar.  Some databases, such as 1Search and Academic Search Premier, have a check box that allows you to narrow your search to just scholarly articles.  However, being able to recognize whether or not you have found a scholarly article is still ultimately your responsibility. Click Read more (below) to learn about some typical features that can help you recognize scholarly articles.

 

Searching a database

The most effective way to search the online databases is to enter terms or keywords that effectively describe your topic.

  • Use broad, meaningful keywords when you search. Don't use sentences or phrases.
  • Use just a few keywords (1-3). You can always add keywords later if you need to refine your search.
  • Use the facets or limits to help refine you search. For example, you can narrow your search by date or by geographic region.
  • When you review your results, look at the abstracts or subject headings for other keywords you can use to improve your search.
  • Be prepared to do several searches. Research is a process that takes time.

 

Finding an article on a topic

You use the keywords from your research topic to search for journal articles on a topic - usually in a database.

Start your searches with broad searches (2-3 keywords, not too specific) in a general database like 1Search or Google Scholar.  Google Scholar is simple to search in, but it does take some practice to learn how to get articles that are not freely available and to make sure you are choosing the best scholarly articles.  <Learn More>

If your topic is more specialized, you may want to search in a subject database.  Article databases are available through the library for almost every topic, from Anthropology to Zoology.  Use the database subject filter to choose a database that matches your topic. <Learn More>

 

Finding the full text of an article

Locating articles: Once you find your citation, you will need to locate the journal to read the article. Some citations will have the full-text of the article available online. For others, click on this button:360 link to full text to see if OSU subscribes to the electronic or the paper copy of the journal. 360 will open a new window and will display a link to full-text when available. If it's not, click the link to the library catalog to check for a paper copy. If neither is available, request the article from Interlibrary Loan: http://osulibrary.orst.edu/ill/.

 

Identifying Peer Reviewed Sources

Using research that has been evaluated by other experts in the field (peer reviewed or refereed) is an efficient way of finding research of value. Some ways to identify if the research is peer-reviewed:

  • Use the database: some databases consist entirely (or almost entirely) of peer-reviewed literature (for example: Sociological Abstracts, Abstracts in Anthropology, ERIC, PsycInfo)
  • Many databases allow you to LIMIT your search to peer-reviewed or scholarly literature (the EBSCOhost databases like Academic Search Premier for example)
  • Check the journal's editorial policy statement for an explicit statement (generally small print at the front of the issue, or visit the journal's web page). Look for a list of editors, which can be an implicit indication of peer review.
  • Ask a librarian for assistance

<Learn More>

 

Searching ERIC

The ERIC database is the best source for education topics. ERIC stands for the Education Resources Information Center and is the largest collection of education materials available. ERIC will help you locates scholarly materials such as journal articles as well as reports, curriculum materials and other unpublished materials.

There is a free version of ERIC located at http://www.eric.gov. It contains the same information but does not link to the full-text of an article the way the library version of ERIC does. While you are a student at OSU, you will want to use the library version of ERIC.


 

Browsing Journals

Sometimes you will want to see what has been published in a specific journal or magazine or just browse the table of contents of a current issue. You have a couple of options:

  1. Search for the journal or magazine on Google. Most journals or magazines have a web page that will lst the table of contents. You may not, however, be able to access the actual article
  2. Use the online databases to get to the journal or magazine content. You can use our online databases or E-journals list to see what has been published in a journal. 

 

     

    Smart searching

    When searching in catalogs and databases:

    • Be creative in the words you use; if one doesn't work, try something else. Think of words with related meaning, such as natural resource management or restoration or conservation
    • Begin with keywords, and use the subjects found in the articles that come up to find more information
    • Use quotation marks around phrases, so they won't be searched as individual words.
    • Use advanced search features in catalogs and databases to limit by date, language, type of article, etc

    For more in-depth information about developing advanced search strategies, check out a tutorial from Purdue University at http://gemini.lib.purdue.edu/core/files/strategies0.html

     

    Electronic Journals

    OSU Libraries subscribes to over 20,000 electronic journals (e-journals). It's easiest to search the e-journals if you have a specific journal or citation to locate.  Always note the date range available for each journal subscription.

    Remember that if we don't have a journal online, we can still get a copy of an article for you via Interlibrary Loan.

     

    Finding a specific article

    If you have an article citation and want to find that specific article, you can find it several ways.

    • 1Search - Use the article title.  It is often useful to put quotes around the article title to find the exact title you want.
      • Example:  "Feasability of a Home-Delivered Internet Obesity Prevention Program for Fourth-Grade Students" 
    • OSU Libraries catalog  - Use the journal title, then navigate to the article using the date, volume, issue and page number information.
    • Google Scholar - Use the article title.  Again, it is often useful to put quotes around the article title to find the exact title you want.  If you find articles that are not freely available, be sure to set up your Google Scholar preferences to talk to the OSU Libraries, or search the e-journals or catalog to see if we have the article.

     

    Smart searching

    When searching in catalogs and databases:

    • Be creative in the words you use; if one doesn't work, try something else. Think of words with related meaning, such as natural resource management or restoration or conservation
    • Begin with keywords, and use the subjects found in the articles that come up to find more information
    • Use quotation marks around phrases, so they won't be searched as individual words.
    • Use advanced search features in catalogs and databases to limit by date, language, type of article, etc

    For more in-depth information about developing advanced search strategies, check out a tutorial from Purdue University at http://gemini.lib.purdue.edu/core/files/strategies0.html

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